Residency

Open Call

       With the establishment of the Loss and Damage Fund at the COP 27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, and the operationalisation of the Fund just over a week ago at COP 28 in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, the work of integrating knowledge and perspectives of artistic practitioners representing affected communities into conversations on Loss and Damage has never been more urgent. 

       Following the Ways of Repair : Loss & Damage open call which received over 740 applications, three project proposals have now been selected for development through the program's artistic research residency. These three successful proposals have been judged upon a criteria including: the artistic potential to radically engage with the Loss and Damage framework, the potential to provoke critical questions and the possibility to create dialogue and impact within the realm of international climate policymaking. Each selected project has the potential to assess how loss and damage can be addressed and expand the understanding of intangible loss and damage to culture, health and mental health, and social cohesion, identity and sense of place. The selected artists will each receive a £10,000 research stipend, mentoring support and will be embedded into the Loss and Damage Collaboration (L&DC), a global network of climate change researchers, policymakers, advocates, layers, and negotiators working on Loss and Damage — the policies and plans developed to address loss and damage. 


Residents  


Gabriela de Matos (BR)

Candomblé terreiros: Sacred Shields Against Salvador’s Climate Crisis

Candomblé terreiros explores how terreiros —the sacred spaces of the Afro-Brazilian Candomblé religion— through their ancestral knowledge and their relationship with nature preservation, could address the loss and damage being caused by the climate crisis in the city of Salvador, Brazil. These sacred spaces —which are deeply rooted in Afro-Brazilian heritage— are hypothesised to offer environmental benefits particularly in marginalised communities. This project will study how vulnerable communities in the city of Salvador have been affected by the climate crisis and will assess the role of terreiros in building resilience and addressing loss and damage. By documenting construction techniques and spatial arrangements, the project aims to quantify the terreiros' microclimatic influence and their role in enhancing local living conditions in urban spaces in relation to climate intensified events such as heat waves. Utilising fieldwork, interviews, architectural analysis, drawings, and ongoing dialogues with the community, the study will document how ancestral knowledge embedded in terreiro structures can inform sustainable urban planning and how it can be used as a transformative tool to address loss and damage. The project is part of Gabriela’s ongoing research on Afro-Brazilian architecture examined through an intersectional lens of race, culture, and environmental justice. 

       Gabriela de Matos is an architect, urban planner, researcher, professor, and curator. Gabriela’s background is in Sustainability and Management of the Built Environment. She was a co-president of the Brazilian Institute of Architects. She founded the Arquitetas Negras Project, which maps the production of black Brazilian women architects, and is the publisher of the book Arquitetas Negras vol.1, which won the IAB-sp award for Best Architecture Publication. She was the co-curator of the Brazilian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale of Architecture (2023) and won the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. She is currently a Master’s student at the Center for the Study of Diversities, Intolerances and Conflicts at the Faculty of Philosophy, Letters and Human Sciences. 

Nombuso Mathibela & Sibonelo Gumede (ZA)

Phoshoza sunduz’ama bhun’ahambe: Interpreting the (in) tangible planetary futures of bow instrument ecospheres in Kwa-Zulu Natal

       
Princess Constance Magogo Sibilile Mantithi Ngangezinye kaDinizulu is a musician, ancestor, and senior member of the Zulu royal family who played a traditional bow instrument called the Ugubhu, an unbraced gourd bow instrument that is native to Nguni speaking groups in South Africa and predominantly played by women. By exploring the archives of music makers such as Princess Magogo, Phoshoza sunduz’ama bhun’ahambe will trace the historical and cultural processes of this music tradition in order to examine the intangible loss and damage that the climate crisis is causing to the life worlds of culture, heritage and identity in the region. The project aims to assess loss and damage through the making tradition of uMakhweyane, an indigenous bow instrument of the Kwa-Zulu Natal province, South Africa, in relation to climate intensified disaster that the province has experienced, including the devastating flooding and landslides of April 2022 which led to the loss of 448 lives, the displacement of 40,000 people and economic cost of $1.6 billion.To Nombuso and Sibonelo, the climate crisis is an ongoing debasement of the relationship between humans and other living organisms constituted by capitalism, a financial, cultural, social and spiritual system of Western invention. Under such conditions, they choose to think about what cultural modes can teach us about revolt and re-invention in the production of this indigenous song tradition. Through this perspective, they seek to comprehend the significance of loss and damage within the context of an environmentally conscious form of music that originates from the roots of trees, barks, and other natural elements. 

       Nombuso Mathibela is a cultural worker, educator, writer, and vinyl selector based in Johannesburg, working through sound, focusing on anti-colonial liberation histories and cultural ecological behaviours in Africa. She is the founder of Jewel Scents & Song and archivist at the Centre for the Study of Race, Class and Gender at the University of Johannesburg.

       Sibonelo Gumede is an urbanist and cultural worker based in Cape Town, South Africa. Gumede’s practice explores the temporalities of colonial afterlives, in a bid to make connections between aspects of space and relationality through which connective memory and reparative practices can be built. Gumede is also an experienced researcher as well as an Institutional Development and M&E practitioner, specialising in urban environments and issues related to cities, environment and development.

       Zahra Malkani (PK)

A Ubiquitous Wetness

 
         A Ubiquitous Wetness explores the instrumentalisation of musical and oral traditions as remembrance and resistance against environmental devastation, dispossession and erasure. At the centre of this project is the Indus, an ancient river that is both deeply revered and immensely brutalised. The cataclysmic climate change intensified Pakistan floods that ravaged this region, submerging one-third of the country, displacing millions and causing over $50 billion in loss and damage. These floods emerged following a long history of extractivist interventions on the aquatic ecology of Pakistan, including: dams, canals, barrages, excessive and unfettered fishing, ceaseless construction along natural aquatic pathways, sand mining, the dispossession of water and land from its custodians, and much more.In A Ubiquitous Wetness, Zahra explores these themes through sonic practice and oral traditions that bring together devotion and dissent, poetry and protest. She is interested in bringing forth the rich and situated ecological knowledges and the revolutionary spirit contained in these sounds as a kind of eco-pedagogy. She engages these sounds as intimate and embodied teaching tools packed with deep ecological wisdom offering practices that survive, adapt and endure— that invoke and animate endangered worlds. 
    
       Zahra Malkani
is a multidisciplinary artist. Collaboration, research and pedagogy are at the heart of her practice, exploring sound, dissent and devotion against militarism and infrastructural violence. Working across multiple media —including text, video and sound— she explores the politics of development, displacement and dispossession in Pakistan through the lens of dissident ecological knowledges and traditions of environmental resistance. She is a co-founder with Shahana Rajani of Karachi LaJamia, a lamakan site for study, solidarity and seeking. She was born and raised in/by Karachi. 

Selection Process

        Over three weeks, an external jury composed of Sakshi Aravind, Hannah Entwisle-Chapuisat, Thandi Loewenson, Nestor Pestana and Sarker Proctick, worked tirelessly alongside the Ways of Repair : Loss & Damage team to review submissions and establish a longlist, reduce this to a shortlist and conduct interviews with shortlisted applicants. With so many excellent proposals covering many important loss and damage issues, narrowing this down to only three was extremely challenging. However, we applaud and recognise the engagement with, and contribution to, the loss and damage discourse of those who were shortlisted and longlisted.

Residency

Open Call

             With the establishment of the Loss and Damage Fund at the COP 27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, and the operationalisation of the Fund just over a week ago at COP 28 in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, the work of integrating knowledge and perspectives of artistic practitioners representing affected communities into conversations on Loss and Damage has never been more urgent. 

       Following the Ways of Repair : Loss & Damage open call which received over 740 applications, three project proposals have now been selected for development through the program's artistic research residency. These three successful proposals have been judged upon a criteria including: the artistic potential to radically engage with the Loss and Damage framework, the potential to provoke critical questions and the possibility to create dialogue and impact within the realm of international climate policymaking. Each selected project has the potential to assess how loss and damage can be addressed and expand the understanding of intangible loss and damage to culture, health and mental health, and social cohesion, identity and sense of place. 

       The selected artists will each receive a £10,000 research stipend, mentoring support and will be embedded into the Loss and Damage Collaboration (L&DC), a global network of climate change researchers, policymakers, advocates, layers, and negotiators working on Loss and Damage — the policies and plans developed to address loss and damage.

Find the press release here.



Gabriela de
Matos (BR)

Candomblé terreiros: Sacred Shields Against Salvador’s Climate Crisis

Candomblé terreiros explores how terreiros —the sacred spaces of the Afro-Brazilian Candomblé religion— through their ancestral knowledge and their relationship with nature preservation, could address the loss and damage being caused by the climate crisis in the city of Salvador, Brazil. These sacred spaces —which are deeply rooted in Afro-Brazilian heritage— are hypothesised to offer environmental benefits particularly in marginalised communities. This project will study how vulnerable communities in the city of Salvador have been affected by the climate crisis and will assess the role of terreiros in building resilience and addressing loss and damage. By documenting construction techniques and spatial arrangements, the project aims to quantify the terreiros' microclimatic influence and their role in enhancing local living conditions in urban spaces in relation to climate intensified events such as heat waves. Utilising fieldwork, interviews, architectural analysis, drawings, and ongoing dialogues with the community, the study will document how ancestral knowledge embedded in terreiro structures can inform sustainable urban planning and how it can be used as a transformative tool to address loss and damage. The project is part of Gabriela’s ongoing research on Afro-Brazilian architecture examined through an intersectional lens of race, culture, and environmental justice. 



Gabriela de Matos is an architect, urban planner, researcher, professor, and curator. Gabriela’s background is in Sustainability and Management of the Built Environment. She was a co-president of the Brazilian Institute of Architects. She founded the Arquitetas Negras Project, which maps the production of black Brazilian women architects, and is the publisher of the book Arquitetas Negras vol.1, which won the IAB-sp award for Best Architecture Publication. She was the co-curator of the Brazilian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale of Architecture (2023) and won the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. She is currently a Master’s student at the Center for the Study of Diversities, Intolerances and Conflicts at the Faculty of Philosophy, Letters and Human Sciences.

Nombuso Mathibela & Sibonelo Gumede (ZA)

Phoshoza sunduz’ama bhun’ahambe: Interpreting the (in) tangible planetary futures of bow instrument ecospheres in Kwa-Zulu Natal

       
Princess Constance Magogo Sibilile Mantithi Ngangezinye kaDinizulu is a musician, ancestor, and senior member of the Zulu royal family who played a traditional bow instrument called the Ugubhu, an unbraced gourd bow instrument that is native to Nguni speaking groups in South Africa and predominantly played by women. By exploring the archives of music makers such as Princess Magogo, Phoshoza sunduz’ama bhun’ahambe will trace the historical and cultural processes of this music tradition in order to examine the intangible loss and damage that the climate crisis is causing to the life worlds of culture, heritage and identity in the region. The project aims to assess loss and damage through the making tradition of uMakhweyane, an indigenous bow instrument of the Kwa-Zulu Natal province, South Africa, in relation to climate intensified disaster that the province has experienced, including the devastating flooding and landslides of April 2022 which led to the loss of 448 lives, the displacement of 40,000 people and economic cost of $1.6 billion.To Nombuso and Sibonelo, the climate crisis is an ongoing debasement of the relationship between humans and other living organisms constituted by capitalism, a financial, cultural, social and spiritual system of Western invention. Under such conditions, they choose to think about what cultural modes can teach us about revolt and re-invention in the production of this indigenous song tradition. Through this perspective, they seek to comprehend the significance of loss and damage within the context of an environmentally conscious form of music that originates from the roots of trees, barks, and other natural elements.


Nombuso Mathibela is a cultural worker, educator, writer, and vinyl selector based in Johannesburg, working through sound, focusing on anti-colonial liberation histories and cultural ecological behaviours in Africa. She is the founder of Jewel Scents & Song and archivist at the Centre for the Study of Race, Class and Gender at the University of Johannesburg.
Sibonelo Gumede is an urbanist and cultural worker based in Cape Town, South Africa. Gumede’s practice explores the temporalities of colonial afterlives, in a bid to make connections between aspects of space and relationality through which connective memory and reparative practices can be built. Gumede is also an experienced researcher as well as an Institutional Development and M&E practitioner, specialising in urban environments and issues related to cities, environment and development.


Zahra
Malkani (PK)

A Ubiquitous Wetness

A Ubiquitous Wetness explores the instrumentalisation of musical and oral traditions as remembrance and resistance against environmental devastation, dispossession and erasure. At the centre of this project is the Indus, an ancient river that is both deeply revered and immensely brutalised. The cataclysmic climate change intensified Pakistan floods that ravaged this region, submerging one-third of the country, displacing millions and causing over $50 billion in loss and damage. These floods emerged following a long history of extractivist interventions on the aquatic ecology of Pakistan, including: dams, canals, barrages, excessive and unfettered fishing, ceaseless construction along natural aquatic pathways, sand mining, the dispossession of water and land from its custodians, and much more.In A Ubiquitous Wetness, Zahra explores these themes through sonic practice and oral traditions that bring together devotion and dissent, poetry and protest. She is interested in bringing forth the rich and situated ecological knowledges and the revolutionary spirit contained in these sounds as a kind of eco-pedagogy. She engages these sounds as intimate and embodied teaching tools packed with deep ecological wisdom offering practices that survive, adapt and endure— that invoke and animate endangered worlds. 


Zahra Malkani is a multidisciplinary artist. Collaboration, research and pedagogy are at the heart of her practice, exploring sound, dissent and devotion against militarism and infrastructural violence. Working across multiple media —including text, video and sound— she explores the politics of development, displacement and dispossession in Pakistan through the lens of dissident ecological knowledges and traditions of environmental resistance. She is a co-founder with Shahana Rajani of Karachi LaJamia, a lamakan site for study, solidarity and seeking. She was born and raised in/by Karachi.

Selection
Process

       Over three weeks, an external jury composed of Sakshi Aravind, Hannah Entwisle-Chapuisat, Thandi Loewenson, Nestor Pestana and Sarker Proctick, worked tirelessly alongside the Ways of Repair : Loss & Damage team to review submissions and establish a longlist, reduce this to a shortlist and conduct interviews with shortlisted applicants. With so many excellent proposals covering many important loss and damage issues, narrowing this down to only three was extremely challenging. However, we applaud and recognise the engagement with, and contribution to, the loss and damage discourse of those who were shortlisted and longlisted.

Open Call

       With the establishment of the Loss and Damage Fund at the COP 27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, and the operationalisation of the Fund just over a week ago at COP 28 in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, the work of integrating knowledge and perspectives of artistic practitioners representing affected communities into conversations on Loss and Damage has never been more urgent. 

       Following the Ways of Repair : Loss & Damage open call which received over 740 applications, three project proposals have now been selected for development through the program's artistic research residency. These three successful proposals have been judged upon a criteria including: the artistic potential to radically engage with the Loss and Damage framework, the potential to provoke critical questions and the possibility to create dialogue and impact within the realm of international climate policymaking. Each selected project has the potential to assess how loss and damage can be addressed and expand the understanding of intangible loss and damage to culture, health and mental health, and social cohesion, identity and sense of place. 

       The selected artists will each receive a £10,000 research stipend, mentoring support and will be embedded into the Loss and Damage Collaboration (L&DC), a global network of climate change researchers, policymakers, advocates, layers, and negotiators working on Loss and Damage — the policies and plans developed to address loss and damage.

Participation

      Taking place between January 2024 and January 2025, the Ways of Repair : Loss and Damage public online program will feature four key moments (three workshops and a symposium) aimed at fostering dialogue between the selected artists and/or curators and Loss and Damage researchers from around the world.  

Throughout Ways of Repair : Loss and Damage the selected artists and/or curators will be expected to participate in these key moments but without the pressure of producing a final research outcome. Instead, they will be invited to contribute a digital restitution of their experience to be shared on the Ways of Repair : Loss and Damage website and presented during UNFCCC COP 29 (TBC) and/or the symposium. The research residency will be conducted online and include moments of exchange between the facilitators and selected artists and/or curators as a cohort, mentoring sessions, as well as networking and research and development opportunities tailored to their research focus.
      

Residents

         Gabriela de Matos (BR)

Candomblé terreiros: Sacred Shields Against Salvador’s Climate CrisisCandomblé terreiros explores how terreiros —the sacred spaces of the Afro-Brazilian Candomblé religion— through their ancestral knowledge and their relationship with nature preservation, could address the loss and damage being caused by the climate crisis in the city of Salvador, Brazil. These sacred spaces —which are deeply rooted in Afro-Brazilian heritage— are hypothesised to offer environmental benefits particularly in marginalised communities. This project will study how vulnerable communities in the city of Salvador have been affected by the climate crisis and will assess the role of terreiros in building resilience and addressing loss and damage. By documenting construction techniques and spatial arrangements, the project aims to quantify the terreiros' microclimatic influence and their role in enhancing local living conditions in urban spaces in relation to climate intensified events such as heat waves. Utilising fieldwork, interviews, architectural analysis, drawings, and ongoing dialogues with the community, the study will document how ancestral knowledge embedded in terreiro structures can inform sustainable urban planning and how it can be used as a transformative tool to address loss and damage. The project is part of Gabriela’s ongoing research on Afro-Brazilian architecture examined through an intersectional lens of race, culture, and environmental justice. Gabriela de Matos is an architect, urban planner, researcher, professor, and curator. Gabriela’s background is in Sustainability and Management of the Built Environment. She was a co-president of the Brazilian Institute of Architects. She founded the Arquitetas Negras Project, which maps the production of black Brazilian women architects, and is the publisher of the book Arquitetas Negras vol.1, which won the IAB-sp award for Best Architecture Publication. She was the co-curator of the Brazilian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale of Architecture (2023) and won the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. She is currently a Master’s student at the Center for the Study of Diversities, Intolerances and Conflicts at the Faculty of Philosophy, Letters and Human Sciences.‍

Deadline

       Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage seeks three artists and/or curators, (applying as individuals or as collectives) working within any medium to undertake new or ongoing artistic research projects engaging with loss and damage. Each selected participant or collective will receive a stipend of USD $12600 / £10,000. 

Participation

       Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage are especially interested in artist research proposals exploring the intangible loss and damage that the climate crisis is causing to culture and heritage, identity and health (physical, mental, spiritual), as well as reparative acts, modes of healing, community building and kinship-making, that emerge in response to the need to address loss and damage. 

Some ways in which artists might engage with Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage may include documenting lived experiences of loss and damage, in tangible, experiential and empathetic ways; responding to specific instances of loss and damage, through practices of healing, restoration, reconstruction;  or participatory approaches to Loss and Damage advocacy/activism; exploring the ethical and / or philosophical questions intrinsic to Loss and Damage discourse, or by challenging the Loss and Damage framing itself, and exploring its relationship to the injustice and inequalities at the heart of the climate crisis.

Jury

       Before applying we strongly recommend downloading and reading the .PDF version of the open call here.

Application

Date: 12th of November 2023
Time: 23:59 GMT
Interview dates:  30th November - 1st December 2023
Selected artists announced: by the 9th of December 2023 during UNFCCC COP28

Residency

         Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage particularly welcomes applications from practitioners representing the Most Affected People and Areas (MAPA) — those at the forefront of intersectional experiences of the climate crisis in the global South and North. The residency and the programme of events will take place online. 

Proposals

        The members of the Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage jury are to be selected for their expertise in the fields of art and culture, literature, political, social, and environmental sciences and gender studies. Jury members will be announced soon.

Information

How to Apply: To apply for Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage please fill in the form here.

Privacy and GDPR: By submitting the above form you acknowledge our Privacy Policy.     

Contact: For any problems relating to the form above and/or questions not answered by the .PDF please email: info[@]actsofrepair.com
Deadline

Date: 12th of November 2023
Time: 23:59 GMT
Interview dates:  30th of November - 1st December 2023
Selected artists will be announced during UNFCCC COP28 by the 9th of December 2023

The Residency

Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage seeks three artists and/or curators, (applying as individuals or as collectives) working within any medium to undertake new or ongoing artistic research projects engaging with loss and damage. Each selected participant or collective will receive a stipend of USD $12600 / £10,000. 

Participation

Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage
particularly welcomes applications from practitioners representing the Most Affected People and Areas (MAPA) — those at the forefront of intersectional experiences of the climate crisis in the global South and North. The residency and the programme of events will take place online. 

Suggestions for Proposals and Responses

Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage
are especially interested in artist research proposals exploring the intangible loss and damage that the climate crisis is causing to culture and heritage, identity and health (physical, mental, spiritual), as well as reparative acts, modes of healing, community building and kinship-making, that emerge in response to the need to address loss and damage. Some ways in which artists might engage with
Acts of Repair: Loss and Damage may include documenting lived experiences of loss and damage, in tangible, experiential and empathetic ways; responding to specific instances of loss and damage, through practices of healing, restoration, reconstruction;  or participatory approaches to Loss and Damage advocacy/activism; exploring the ethical and / or philosophical questions intrinsic to Loss and Damage discourse, or by challenging the Loss and Damage framing itself, and exploring its relationship to the injustice and inequalities at the heart of the climate crisis.

Jury

The members of the jury for the award are to be selected for their expertise in the fields of art and culture, literature, political and social science and environmental sciences and gender studies. Jury members will be announced at a latter date.

Further Information

Before applying we strongly recommend downloading and reading the .PDF version of the open call here.

Application Form

To Apply please fill in the form here.

Privacy and GDPR

By submitting the above form you acknowledge our Privacy Policy.
Contact

For any problems relating to the form above and/or questions not answered by the .PDF please email: info@actsofrepair.com

Judges

Sakshi Aravind
Sakshi is a lawyer and writer whose research areas include comparative environmental law, constitutional law, Marxist legal theory and political economy, sovereignties, and jurisprudence. Sakshi's research is transdisciplinary with a deep situatedness in law. Sakshi is currently working on her new project, Plural Sovereignties and the Emergence of New Legalities and is a Lecturer in Law and Social Justice at the Newcastle Law School in the United Kingdom.
Hannah Entwisle Chapuisat
Hannah is a Swiss-American curator and a lawyer with 20 years of experience working with the United Nations, States, and non-governmental organisations on operational and policy issues related to humanitarian affairs and the protection of displaced people in conflict and disaster situations. Hannah is the co-founder and curator of DISPLACEMENT: Uncertain Journeys, director of the Swiss art association La Fruitière.
Thandi Loewenson
Thandi (b.1989, Harare, Zimbabwe) is an architectural designer/researcher who mobilises design, fiction and performance to stoke embers of emancipatory political thought and fires of collective action, and to feel for the contours of other, possible worlds. Thandi is a Senior Tutor at the Royal College of Art in London, United Kingdom, and co-foundress of the architectural collective BREAK//LINE – an ‘act of creative solidarity’ which ‘resists definition with intent’.
Nestor Pestana
Nestor is a Venezuelan-Portuguese multimedia artist, digital designer and educator focusing on the necessity for critical engagement on the possibilities of emerging technologies and their potential societal and environmental impacts, who often works in collaboration with scientists and technologists. Nestor is a tutor and researcher at the Royal College of Art and at University College London, in London, United Kingdom.
Sarker Protick
Sarker is an artist and educator working with photography, video and sound that is built on long-term surveys rooted in Bangladesh. Sarker teaches at the South Asian Media Institute – Pathshala in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and is a co-curator of Chobi Mela —the longest running International Photography Festival in Asia— and is represented by Shrine Empire in Delhi, India.

Shortlist

      The shortlist for the Ways of Repair :  Loss and Damage open call is composed of 12 applicants. Shortlisted applicants include :

Abdessamad El Montassir

Archivo Familiar del Río Colorado

Colectivo Micelio

Gabriela de Matos

Gloria Pavita

Ignacio Acosta, Liz-Marie Nilsen, May-Britt Öhman & Gun Aira

Jorge Vega Matos & Sarah Kantrowitz

Lakshmi Nivas Collective

Nombuso Mathibela & Sibonelo Gumede

Sabba Khan & Amneet Johal

Yvan King “Mvfasta” Mukunzi & Nelly Tunga Ashimwe (NERIWEST)

Zahra Malkani

Longlist

      The longlist for the Ways of Repair :  Loss and Damage open call is composed of 34 applicants. Longlisted applicants include :

Abdessamad El Montassir

Archivo Familiar del Río Colorado

Colectivo Micelio

Bill Balaskas

Bola Chinelo

Dane Carlson, Sonam Lama, & Yungdrung Tsewang Gurung

Dennis Dizon

Dhaqan Collective

Elizabeth Cox

Emily Sarsam

Ethel-Ruth Tawe

Gabriela de Matos

Gloria Pavita

Hamza Ali

Ignacio Acosta, Liz-Marie Nilsen, May-Britt Öhman & Gun Aira

James Notin

Jorge Vega Matos & Sarah Kantrowitz

Justice Nnanna

Karolina Breguła

Lakshmi Nivas Collective

Maeve Brennan

Mar Mordente

Nombuso Mathibela & Sibonelo Gumede

Oluwatobiloba Ajayi

Sabba Khan & Amneet Johal

কে বা কাহারা (Ke-ba-kahara)

Santiago Reyes Villaveces & Daniel Villegas Vélez

Sharbendu De

The Forest Curriculum

Vishal Kumaraswamy

Wilhelmina Welsch & Judha Su

Yemoh Odoi (Yemoh777s)

Yvan King “Mvfasta” Mukunzi & Nelly Tunga Ashimwe (NERIWEST)

Zahra Malkani

Application Form

For any problems relating to this form and to ask questions not answered by the open call PDF please email:

info[@]waysofrepair.com

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